Marguerite Patten


"Marguerite Patten gave me my first inspiration to cook."  so says Gary Rhodes.
"I had decided to do this lemon sponge for Sunday lunch one day. I remember turning it out at table and seeing everyone drool as this intense smell of lemon filled the room and the thick lemon sauce dripped down over the sponge."
Nigel Slater writes of happy hours spent lost in her 'Cookery in Colour' as a boy.
They were not the first and nor will they be the last to be inspired by this extraordinary woman.

Our full interview with Marguerite includes contributions from Brian Turner, Valentine Warner and her daughter, Judith Patten.


A Prisoner of War's Christmas


Kriegie Part Two





Germany 1944. Christmas Day in Stalag Luft 1 PoW Camp where Potage Churchill is on the menu... and a home-brewed cocktail of dubious origins...


Geoff Rothwell joined the RAF in 1939 at the age of 19. He miraculously survived 71 operations as a bomber pilot, but in September 1944 his plane crashed on the Dutch island of Texel and he spent the rest of the war in Stalag Luft 1 in Germany.

He talks about the food experiences of the 'kriegies' (prisoners of war) while looking at the illustrated diary kept by his room-mate, Bohdan Arct , later published as Prisoner of war: my secret journal.

Part One - Oberürsel Interrogation Centre 

Part Two - Stalag Luft 1 - Red Cross Parcels

Part Three - "Belt Up" - German Rations

Part Four - Kriegie Recipes and Spam






Title says it all... or does it? 

Which meaning of the word is the first one you think of?  Here's a short vox pop introduction to the subject. 

To be continued...


 Watch video


From the back of the shelf: Cookbook Quote No. 4

Occupation Recipes 1

"We're all quite well, but getting thinner
Not much for tea, still less for dinner
Though not exactly on our uppers
We've said 'Adieu' to cold ham suppers"

The 70th anniversary of the end of World War 2 seems a fitting time for the latest cookbook quote, an extract from the booklet  A Collection of Occupation Recipes by Lillie Aubin Morris published by Jersey Museums Service in 1994.  

The recipes themselves are indicative of the hardship suffered during the German occupation of the Channel Islands: limpet stew, pastry without butter, salad dressing without oil, plain flour blancmange, potato jelly. But it is the Introduction by Beth Lloyd that sets out some stark facts.


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