Countryman's Cooking - W.M.W. Fowler

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Willie Fowler's Countryman's Cooking was written for men.

W.M.W. Fowler joined Bomber Command in WW2, flew Lancasters, was shot down by the Germans and ended up in Stalag Luft 3.  When he returned to Cumbria after his release in 1945,  he took to farming mink, then daffodils, while rediscovering the delights of hunting, shooting and fishing, not to mention cooking, eating and womanising.  We have three extracts read by Rupert Baker to whet the appetite...

The Table Comes First

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Adam Gopnik, author and writer for The New Yorker magazine, came to London in late November for the UK launch of his new book. He credits Fergus Henderson for unwittingly giving him the title, The Table Comes First, and the two of them met up at St. John Hotel where the conversation ran from subjects as diverse as farting cows and the worrying proliferation of square plates in France...

 

Reza's Indian Spice

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With his usual infectious energy and enthusiasm, Reza Mahammad tells us how a trip to Durban in South Africa inspired one of the dishes in his beautiful new book, Reza's Indian Spice: Eastern Recipes for Western Cooks.  And then he shows us how it's done! 

Here is the video and accompanying recipe

 

 

 

Reza's Indian Spice is published by Quadrille Publishing




Want more?  Watch Reza's Roots

 

 

Loch Fyne

 

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In the late 1970s Johnny Noble, laird of Ardkinglas, and marine biologist Andy Lane succeeded in growing oysters in the waters of Loch Fyne.  From the humble beginning of a roadside stall by the shore, the venture grew and grew. Although smoked salmon has overtaken oyster production, Loch Fyne oysters are  eaten in restaurants throughout the land and even as far afield as Hong Kong. A group of businesses has developed based on the principles of good food, sustainably sourced and simply presented by people who care.  Andy Lynes interviewed Virginia Sumsion, Marketing Manager for Loch Fyne and niece of founder Johnny Noble.

 

Reza's Roots

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REZA MAHAMMAD, owner of the famed Star Of India in Kensington, TV celebrity and much loved personality, talks about his father’s early struggles when he arrived as a stowaway in 1937. He and a handful of friends attempted to establish Indian cuisine in England and eventually succeeded in changing the eating habits of a nation.

Kitchen Essays by Agnes Jekyll - No.2

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Agnes Jekyll's gift for friendship and organisational skills made her an excellent hostess.

Helen Garlick reads three more extracts from Kitchen Essays, published in The Times in 1922, in which Lady Jekyll passes on 'some of the wit and wisdom of her clever and imaginative housekeeping'.

Edward Trencom's Nose - Giles Milton

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Edward Trencom has bumbled through life, relying on his trusty nose to turn the family cheese shop into the most celebrated fromagerie in England.

Author Giles Milton has chosen two extracts to read.

 

Relish: My Life on a Plate - Prue Leith

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Prue Leith has led an extraordinarily rich and varied life.  Born in South Africa, she left for France as a young woman, worked as an au pair and studied at the Sorbonne.  But it was in London that she enrolled at the Cordon Bleu and became a caterer. She opened Leith's restaurant in the swinging sixties and it quickly established itself as the place to be seen.  Her clientele included all of the movers and shakers of the day. Six years later came the cookery school which still bears her name.  Successful business woman, newspaper columnist, government advisor, novelist, she also sustained a happy marriage and raised two children.

Here, for the very first time, Prue can be heard reading extracts from her autobiography.

Relish: My Life on a Plate is searingly honest, tender and very funny.

 

Soho Landmarks - Bar Italia

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The original London coffee bar. Opened in the middle of the last century initially to provide workers in the Soho area a place to eat after they finished work in the local restaurants, it went on to became a beloved institution.
Still family owned, it is now run by the grandsons of the original owner. Tony tells the story.

Chateau Latif

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Fulbright Scholar, Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the City University of New York, Latif Jiji is also the only person known to grow, harvest and turn his grapes into wine in Manhattan! He resides on the upper East Side.

Leaving his native Baghdad in 1946, Professor Latif, a Jew, never returned to the country of his birth but continued the tradition of his father, who also grew wine.

This wonderfully eccentric idea has been the subject of TV interviews  and featured in newspaper articles as diverse as Time Magazine, New York Times and The New York  Post.